Blogs

The NIESR blog is a forum for Institute research staff to provide an informed, independent view on current economic issues and recent NIESR research. The views expressed here are those of the authors, and are not necessarily those of the Institute.

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 20 October, 2021 - 13:18

CPI Inflation fell to 3.1% from the previous months 3.2%.  Inflation was expected to fall as there was a “base effect” of -0.4% as the increase in inflation in August-September 2020 dropped out (this spike of 0.4% was partly due to the rebound from the Eat Out to Help Out and VAT cut in August 2020).  However, in addition to this base effect, there was a significant element of new inflation, with prices rising by 0.3% between September and August. This followed from a very sharp rise of 0.7% in July-August.

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Rachael Cheung

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Dr Claudine Bowyer-Crane

Posted: 18 October, 2021 - 13:28

In a previous blog, we wrote about the importance of establishing an evidence base for interventions and identified funding as a key issue.  This has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.  How can services provide the best possible evidence-based interventions if the funding for service delivery and evaluation is not available? 

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Dr Katharine Stockland

Posted: 30 September, 2021 - 18:26

With the close of the furlough scheme at the end of September, there are growing signs that older workers have remained stuck on furlough during the reopening while younger workers have returned comparatively swiftly to work. Experts have also warned that older workers may be more likely to face unemployment once the scheme ends, prompting fears among these workers that they will face long spells of joblessness or even be forced into early retirement.  

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Rose Lasko-Skinner

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Johnny Runge

Posted: 28 September, 2021 - 10:31

Johnny Runge (Senior Social Researcher, NIESR) & Rose Lasko-Skinner (Demos)

“I just feel that some people are of the opinion that you’re not fired up, you’re not ambitious. I think it’s hard for someone to understand that… I’m nearly 60, but I’m still ambitious.” – Interview participant, woman, 59, working in retail, Yorkshire and the Humber.

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Paul Mortimer-Lee

Posted: 17 September, 2021 - 11:07

Lockdown ended on 19 July; the furlough will end on 30 September. The economy is set to reach its pre-pandemic activity level, but the Bank of England’s extreme monetary accommodation appears to go on forever. It is past time for the Bank to act to bolster its credibility and to act to avoid un-anchoring inflation expectations.

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Barry Naisbitt

Posted: 17 September, 2021 - 09:29

Our recently published Global Economic Outlook included an upward revision to our projections for global GDP growth this year and next.  Across countries, however, there is considerable divergence in the projected dates at which they will recover their pre-pandemic GDP levels.  Output has already recovered its level from before the pandemic struck in China and the US.  But the US is the only one of the G7 economies to have achieved that so far. 

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 15 September, 2021 - 11:41

CPI inflation rose by a large amount (1.2%) and is now at 3.2%.  Part of this increase was due to the “base effect” of the 0.4% fall in inflation last year (July-August 2020) dropping out of annual inflation. The fall in July-August 2020 reflected the Eat out to Help out Scheme and the reduction in VAT for the hospitality sector. However, in addition to this was a very large element of new inflation, with prices rising by 0.7% between July and August.

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Peter Doyle

Posted: 6 September, 2021 - 13:20

Despite the headline CPI running at 5 1/2 percent in June and July, the 12-month trimmed mean PCE which excludes outliers is reported for June and July at 2 percent, and its monthly annualized rate fell from 3.1 percent in May to 2.4 percent in June, returning to 3.2 percent in July.

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 18 August, 2021 - 11:44

CPI inflation fell by a large amount (0.5%) and is now at 2.0%.  All of this effect was due to the “base effect” of the spike in inflation last year (June-July 2020) dropping out. There was no new inflation in June-July 2021 as the general level of prices remained constant. The reduction in inflation was spread across most sectors, the only exception being Transport, which showed a large month on month increase, largely due to motor fuels and second- hand car prices. Clothing and footwear also showed a significant decrease due to the July sales.

Looking forward, when we allow for the reversal of VAT reductions in the hospitality sector and scheduled rise in household energy prices announced by OFGEM, we expect inflation to increase rapidly in the later months of 2021 reaching a peak of 3.9% or higher in the first quarter of 2022, falling to about 3% by July 2022.

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Miltos Makris

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Flavio Toxvaerd

Posted: 13 August, 2021 - 10:28

The COVID-19 crisis has upended the lives of many, causing almost 200M global infections to date, over 4M deaths and untold damage to the livelihoods of millions. Although the recent vaccine rollout in some parts of the world offers some room for optimism, the epidemic is still far from defeated and many in the developing world are still at significant risk of infection.

The nature of the crisis, ostensibly one related to public health, has proved to be multi-pronged, with economic and social behaviour, public health policy and economic policy closely intertwined and both reacting to and conditioning the future path of the epidemic. 

 

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Paul Mortimer-Lee

Posted: 4 August, 2021 - 13:31

The Federal Reserve underpredicted 2021’s US inflation pick-up but believes the current inflation spike is temporary. If this assessment proves wrong, the result could be lasting higher than targeted inflation, an extended period of high unemployment, or both. To avoid this economic long Covid, the Fed should taper soon to give itself the flexibility to respond with higher rates if inflation fails to retreat as much as it expects.

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 14 July, 2021 - 14:59

Although the origins of national income accounting date back centuries, these concepts were taken up by the British government as a vital part of the war effort when the Central Statistical Office was founded in January 1941 directly from Winston Churchill’s command. The crisis of war drove innovation in the field of economic statistics, creating the need for accurate and useful economic statistics.

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 14 July, 2021 - 10:33

CPI inflation rose by a large amount (0.5%) for the third month running and is now at 2.5%. The contributions to inflation were spread across most types of expenditure, with Transport being the largest. The current high levels of monthly inflation are unlikely to be sustained and are due to recovery of some prices in the first lockdown and short-run adjustment and supply-chain issues. Inflation will continue to increase until it peaks in early 2022 and then comes down again.  The peak may be above 3% but is unlikely to exceed 4%. The high level of inflation in the US is driven by very different factors to UK inflation and we do not expect UK inflation to “catch up” with the high levels of US inflation.

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Prof Jagjit S. Chadha

Posted: 2 July, 2021 - 12:03

We have known since early this year that because of Covid-19 and lockdowns, public examinations would not go ahead this summer. So, the question is how can we design a mechanism to encourage accurate portrayal of pupil performance, when there may be an incentive to exaggerate?

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 17 June, 2021 - 17:21

CPI inflation rose by a large amount (0.6%) for the second month running and is now at 2.1%. The main drivers of the increase from April were Clothing and footwear and Recreation and Culture. Women’s clothing showed some very large increases. The current high levels of monthly inflation are unlikely to be sustained and are due to recovery of some prices from low levels in the first lockdown and short-run adjustment and supply-chain issues. Inflation will continue to increase until it peaks in early 2022 and then comes down again.  The peak may be above 3% but is unlikely to exceed 4%. The high level of inflation in the US is driven by very different factors to UK inflation and we do not expect UK inflation to “catch up” with the high levels of US inflation

 

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Sara Bonetti

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Dr Silke Fricke

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Dr Claudine Bowyer-Crane

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Dr Chiara Manzoni

Posted: 17 June, 2021 - 10:52

There is no doubt that Covid-19 has caused significant disruption to children’s lives and there is understandable concern about their educational progress.  This has only been exacerbated by the recent outcry about the level of funding announced by the government to support their “catch-up” plans, which resulted in the resignation of Sir Kevan Collins.  In addition, the current narrative around “catch-up” does not take account of children’s social and emotional needs as we move forward, focusing primarily on educational outcomes.  Moreover, the Government “catch-up” plan is not clear about its long-term view.  We don’t know what the ongoing impact might be, and children will need a prolonged period of additional support to avoid falling through the net. 

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Dr Andrew Sentance CBE

Posted: 4 June, 2021 - 09:57

The Bank of England is searching for a new Chief Economist, and the formal deadline for applications was Wednesday 2 June. But what is the Bank’s Chief Economist expected to do? And what skills and qualifications does he or she need? After all, the Bank has lots of economists. What special responsibilities does our central bank need a Chief Economist to carry out?

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Prof Huw Dixon

Posted: 19 May, 2021 - 14:41

CPILW rose significantly to 1.5% in April from 0.8% in March. The official CPIH measure of inflation also rose significantly to 1.6%  from 1.0% the previous month.  The gap between the official measure and the measure using lockdown weights has remained small but positive.  This contrasts with the months prior to December 2020, when CPIH was less than CPILW, indicating that the official measure tended to understate inflation in that period. Since December 2020 the two measures have moved closely together indicating that the official measure CPIH is robust to any expenditure shifts resulting from the Pandemic.

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Renato Giacon

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Dr Corrado Macchiarelli

Posted: 18 May, 2021 - 11:51

Renato Giacon; Principal Counsellor, EU Affairs, Policy and Partnerships Vice Presidency, at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

Corrado Macchiarelli; Research Manager for Global Macroeconomics at NIESR

This post was originally published on the LSE blog EUROPP - European Politics and Policy

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Bart Van Ark

Posted: 4 May, 2021 - 09:32

The launch of a series of insight pieces by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) on the contours of a new fiscal framework for the United Kingdom has important implications for investment, productivity and sustained growth – not only for the UK but also for other countries. The economic recovery from the pandemic and the transition to a net-zero economy places a gigantic demand on sound fiscal policies around the world. In addition, the UK is also committed to levelling up disadvantaged regions while retaining and potentially strengthening its global competitiveness in the post-Brexit world.

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