Blog

Posts from NIESR staff and visitors on research findings and policy.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 16 April, 2015 - 08:07 with: Comments
It has been clear for some time that the Conservatives’ plans to achieve a budget surplus in the next  Parliament – regarded with considerable scepticism by most informed observers, from the IMF to the vast majority of leading UK macroeconomists – was dependent on large cuts to spending on working age social security benefits, only a small fraction of which the Conservatives were willing to specify in advance of the election.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 30 March, 2015 - 14:22 with: Comments
This article was originally written for the Recruitment and Employment Confederation's e-book "Building the Best Jobs Market in the World: the Expert View", and is reproduced with permission.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 15 March, 2015 - 09:34 with: Comments
Last week, a government press release  trumpeting the success of the “Troubled Families Programme” (TFP) claimed: More than 105,000 troubled families turned around saving taxpayers an estimated £1.2 billion

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 9 March, 2015 - 10:23 with: Comments
I was at an excellent event last week organised by the Alliance for Useful Evidence entitled "Stats, Facts and Evidence: what role for evidence in the General Election and beyond."    In discussion, I made the point that it was inevitable, whether we like it or not, that politicians would seek to present the evidence in the best possible light, occasionally to the point of misrepresenting it; but that journalists didn't have to go along with thi

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 23 February, 2015 - 13:59 with: Comments
Immigration was a central issue in the 2010 election, with the Conservatives pledging to reduce net migration to the “levels of the 1990s, when it was tens of thousands per year". Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrats suggested an amnesty for irregular migrants who had been in the country for more than ten years.

Dr Alex Bryson

Posted: 17 February, 2015 - 14:24 with: Comments
Can the number of people born in the same year as you (i.e., the size of your birth cohort) affect your chances of success in life?  Or how about the month of year you are born in (i.e., your relative age), does that matter in terms of predicting success? If you are a professional athlete where success and performance can be pretty accurately measured, does any of this birth stuff really matter?