Blog

Posts from NIESR staff and visitors on research findings and policy.

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 3 July, 2015 - 15:54 with: Comments
Events unfolding in the eurozone matter for the UK's referendum. The euro is the main currency of the EU: only two of the twenty eight member nations have official opt-out clauses from joining the single currency. What happens to the euro cannot be separated from the EU, and therefore the choice facing the UK electorate.

Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 30 June, 2015 - 09:16 with: Comments
The lower educational achievement of white working-class pupils has long been recognised as a key challenge for schools. But in recent years, the yardstick against which their under-performance has been measured has changed – from middle-class pupils to children from ethnic minorities. This is due to evidence that pupils from ethnic minorities, including recent migrants and those with English as a second language, have been increasingly outperforming white working-class pupils.

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 23 June, 2015 - 08:59 with: Comments
Scotland’s future borrowing power is the most important issue in the devolution debate. While on the surface a dry subject, consider that differences in US state finances were central in the escalation to civil war and Europe’s current tragedy arises from sub-central borrowing powers within a monetary union.[1] The IMF recently published this paper summarising recent evidence of moral hazard which generally accompanies sub-central borrowing powers.  

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 15 June, 2015 - 14:02 with: Comments
[This blog summarises my review article, “Labour Mobility in the European Union”, published June 15, 2015 in the Palgrave Dictionary of Economics. The full article, which includes detailed references for all the research summarised here, is available free to read for a limited period on the Dictionary website.]

Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 12 June, 2015 - 12:42 with: Comments
How children think about their own ability can affect their progress and achievement at school, according to a number of leading education researchers. The work of Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck and her concept of “mindset” has been particularly influential in the way teachers are trying to change their pupils' views of their own intelligence.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 5 June, 2015 - 10:27 with: Comments
Does  more government borrowing push up interest rates – or, worse still, risk a “Greece-style” panic in the bond markets? I have written about this numerous times over the last five years: here and here for example.  I have argued consistently that it is one of the rare macroeconomic questions to which we can give an absolutely definitive answer.