Blog

Posts from NIESR staff and visitors on research findings and policy.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 22 July, 2014 - 11:22 with: Comments
The recent performance of the UK labour market since the financial crisis has astonished almost everyone. Employment did not fall nearly as much as might have been expected, given the size of the contraction, and the subsequent period of stagnation.  And when it started growing again it grew much faster than expected.  The overall employment rate is now back more or less at its previous peak (in early 2005) and may well rise even further.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 23 June, 2014 - 09:16 with: Comments
On the subjects I write about most – immigration, labour markets, welfare – the British press frequently gets things wrong, sometimes very wrong.  Since I think my position as Director of NIESR gives me both an opportunity and a responsibility to try to improve the quality of public debate on these issues, I do my best to redress the balance. Mostly that’s by blogging, twitter or media commentary. But sometimes, when it’s simply a question of fact, what is really required is not a counterargument, but a correction.
Posted: 18 June, 2014 - 14:06 with: Comments
[Note: the views set out in this post are that of the author, not those of the Equality and Human Rights Commission]

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 4 June, 2014 - 15:18 with: Comments
The publication of two official reports last week making apparently contradictory claims might appear to reflect badly on the 'dismal science' (economics). On the one hand, the Treasury report claims that Scots would be £1,400 better off each year by staying in the union. On the other hand, the Scottish Government claims that Scots would receive a £1,000 bonus per year if Scotland becomes independent. If the officials cannot decide, then is there any hope that the rest of us can make sense of their claims?

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 18 May, 2014 - 16:35 with: Comments
In advance of the latest batch of migration statistics on Thursday from the Office for National Statistics, I thought it was worth trying to summarise what the vast range of data on immigration tells about recent trends. This is not a particularly analytical piece: for excellent summaries about the economics of immigration to the UK, go to this from Jonathan Wadsworth (CEP) or this from CREAM (UCL).

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 11 April, 2014 - 11:03 with: Comments
Does the UK recovery prove wrong those of us who argued that the Government's fiscal consolidation plan, announced in June 2010, was poorly designed and ignored some basic economic principles?  The Chancellor, not surprisingly, says yes: